Paused for thought

Paused for thought

Wednesday, 30 September 2015

The problem with grapes...


I’m guessing you might not read many blog posts about grapes and grapes alone. I don’t suspect they’re a particularly popular topic outside of the first aid and healthy eating arena. Here’s the thing though. I don’t like grapes. I did. I used to munch through bunch after bunch after bunch. Juicy, full-bodied grape after juicy, full-bodied grape appeased my pregnancy induced sweet tooth when I was expecting our eldest. It doesn’t surprise me that some have labelled grapes a super food, and studies have been conducted into the benefits of eating (and in moderation, drinking) grapes. Take the red variety for example. It’s well known that red wine has certain benefits for your heart when drunk in small quantities. This actually comes from resveratrol which is a type of polyphenol contained in the skin so can be easily added to your diet by eating a portion of red grapes. Grapes of all colours (the palette extends to at least 7) contain plenty of vitamin C, and their seeds are packed full of antioxidants.


All that is very interesting. Not to mention they taste great! So, why don’t I like them? Shortly after the arrival of my first born my mind was changed. I found myself at a first aid course being taught how to handle and help a child who was choking. And we were warned: “grapes are a hazard, you must cut them in half”. Grapes are round and malleable, making it very easy for them to be swallowed whole. The windpipe of a child under the age of two is around eight millimetres wide, making it very easy for a grape to become lodged and completely obstruct the airway. The windpipe of an older child is not much bigger, you get the picture. Dislodging a stuck grape can be virtually impossible without proper medical equipment and combine that with the knowledge that you have maybe three or four minutes until a serious situation turns into a deadly one I found myself asking was it worth the risk?


I emerged from the class on the edge of going into some grape cutting frenzy lest my little one come into contact with grapes when he was weaned. I wanted every grape for miles around cut in half just in case. I got twitchy about it at play dates and parties, it consumed my once pragmatic and sensible mind with worry. I even brought it up at every nursery setting I visited and pre-school I went to look around lest they were not aware and might inadvertently offer my son a whole grape. They probably thought I was mad. I was. Mad with love and overcome by my maternal instinct to protect delicate throats from innocent looking monsters.

Around two years after the first course I diligently trotted along to a first aid refresher course. I have been going on first aid courses for as long as I can remember and things change so I know how important it is to keep up to date. This course confirmed that. Half grapes were now also considered a hazard. Sometimes they were still too big. They should be cut into quarters. I started to eye them with distaste in supermarket aisles and in the local greengrocers, opting instead for other varieties of fruit. The inward flow of grapes from a shop to my fridge certainly reduced. I was content with that. Not making a big deal out of them but cutting them into very small pieces when they were on the premises. I good balance I thought.


Then came the news. A local couple had found a black widow spider in a bunch of pre-wrapped grapes that they had bought from a local supermarket. Along with her babies. Quick research showed that this was not uncommon and in some grape growing regions these spiders are actively encouraged to ward off pests. Whilst black widow spiders may not be a huge threat to a healthy adult (they rarely bite and when they do it is uncommon for them to pose a serious problem) they certainly are to children. Just days later, another black widow was found in another punnet of grapes, also from a shop that we frequent. It felt like a sign.

So, there you have it. Somewhere between the choking hazard warning and the unwelcome guests I lost my appetite for those juicy little bites of superfood. We still have grapes on the premises, our boys enjoy them and I still snaffle the odd one in its quarters off their plates, but I will happily admit that we are much more careful now.




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